Category Archives: Resources on Human Rights & International Laws

THAILAND: Stop judicial harassment of Sirikan Charoensiri

19 May 2016

———————————————————————

THAILAND: Stop judicial harassment of Sirikan Charoensiri

ISSUES: Human Rights Defenders; Rule of Law; Fair Trial

———————————————————————

Dear Friends,

The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has received updated information that Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri, a lawyer at Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR), reported herself to the public prosecutor on 12 May 2016, relating to the case in which she was charged for providing legal assistance to 14 pro-democracy activists. Ms. Sirikan’s case has created a perception that lawyers providing legal representation in so called ‘political’ cases may face harassment from police and other State authorities.

CASE NARRATIVE:

Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri is a human rights lawyer who is the one of legal representatives for the 14 student activists from the New Democracy Movement (NDM). The NDM was founded by a core group of mostly students of working class backgrounds from Bangkok and Khon Kaen, who have been actively involved with the campaign to recall democracy in Thailand.

On 26 June 2015, police arrested the 14 student activists in execution of an arrest warrant issued by the Bangkok Military Court. They were charged with violating National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) Order No. 3/2015, which bans gatherings of more than five people, and Article 116 of the Thai Criminal Code regarding sedition. On June 27 the Bangkok Military Court granted remand in custody of the 14 student activists for 12 days. The 13 men are detained at the Bangkok Remand Prison, and one woman is held at the Woman Correctional Institution.

During the night of June 26-27, Ms. Sirikan together with seven other TLHR colleagues were on duty and assisted the 14 students activists as lawyers.

After finishing her duty of providing legal assistance to them at the Bangkok Military Court, Ms. Sirikan was requested by police officials lead by Police Major General Chayapol Chatchaidej, commander of the Sixth Division of Metropolitan Police Bureau, to have her car searched to confiscate some mobile phones, which the students left with the lawyers before being brought to the prisons. Ms. Sirikan refused to let her car be searched, since the officials did not present a search warrant, and there was no justifiable evidence to conduct the search without a warrant at night. The officials then impounded her car overnight, and brought a court warrant to conduct the search on 27 June 2015. Miss Sirikan later filed a complaint of malfeasance, under Section 157 of the Thai Criminal Code, against General Chayapol Chatchayadetch and others for illegally impounding her car.

Consequently, the police filed complaints against her, accusing her of refusing to comply with an official order without any reasonable cause or excuse after being informed of an order of an official given according to the power invested by law, and an offence of concealing or making away of property or document ordered by the official to be sent as evidence or for execution of the law, under Sections 368 and 142 of the Thai Criminal Code, and an offence of giving false information concerning a criminal offence to an inquiry official to subject an individual to a punishment under Sections 172 and 174 of the Criminal Code.

The police investigation at the Chanasongkram Police Station has been completed, and Ms. Sirikan’s case has been sent to the public prosecutor of Dusit District Court in Bangkok. On 27 April 2016, Ms. Sirikan received a summons to report herself to the public prosecutor. The prosecutor informed Ms. Sirikan that police investigators have agreed to press charges against her under Articles 368 and 142 of the Thai Criminal Code on 12 May 2016.

However, under Thai law, after the police have concluded an investigation and decide to proceed with a case, they announce the date on which the case file and the charged person will be presented to the public prosecutor. The public prosecutor will then decide whether to prosecute the case or issue a non-prosecution order. If the public prosecutor decides to issue a prosecution order, he must seek permission from the Attorney General according to Articles 7 and 9 of the Act on Establishment of District Courts and District Court Procedure 1956. The Act does not indicate the timeframe within which the Attorney General must give permission to issue a prosecution order.

Therefore, Ms. Sirikan and her legal team have submitted an appeal for justice with the public prosecutor, to examine more witnesses and consider her legal/factual arguments, and hopefully dismiss the case.

Nevertheless, according to the prosecutor, they will announce whether to indict Ms. Sirikan on 27 July 2016.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Progress of Ms.Sirikan’s other cases

1. Ms. Sirikan’s complaint against Pol.Lt. Gen. Chayapol Chatchayadetch for Malfeasance, an offence under Section 157 of the Thai Criminal Code, for arbitrarily impounding Sirikan’s car overnight as she refused to let her car be searched without a court order, is under investigation by the National Anti-Corruption Commission.

2. The criminal charges against Ms. Sirikan of filing a false police report, an offence under Section 172 (imprisonment not exceeding two years) and Section 174 (imprisonment not exceeding five years) of the Criminal Code–As the inquiry official was informing Ms. Sirikan of the charges on 9 February 2016, Ms.Sirikan’s lawyer asked the inquiry official on the detail of the alleged offence. The inquiry official failed to indicate which information Ms. Sirikan had filed was false. Thus, Ms. Sirikan refused to be informed of the charges in this case. The inquiry official did not yet press the charges against her, and shall question the accuser for clarification of which information was false as alleged. The inquiry official will summon Ms. Sirikan to inform these charges later. At this time, Ms. Sirikan is not charged by police with two offences of filing a false police report. However, it is probable that the police will summon her to inform the charges again.

SUGGESTED ACTION:

Please write a letter to the following government authorities to urge them to drop the charges against Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri and to maintain its respect for the independence of lawyers and ensure lawyers are able to conduct their professional functions without fear of official reprisals. Please also be informed that the AHRC is writing a separate letter to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Independence of Judges and Lawyers calling for their intervention into this matter.

To support this case, please click here:

SAMPLE LETTER:

Dear ___________,

THAILAND: Stop Judicial Harassment of Sirikan Charoensiri

Name of victim: Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri

Names of alleged perpetrators: the police lead by Pol. Maj. Gen. Chayapol Chatchaidej, commander of the Sixth Division of Metropolitan Police Bureau

Date of incident: 27 June 2015

Place of incident: Bangkok, Thailand

I am writing to voice my deep concern regarding the recent cases of intimidation and harassment against human rights lawyers in Thailand. Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri is a human rights lawyer who is the one of legal representatives for the 14 student activists from the New Democracy Movement (NDM).

On 26 June 2015, police arrested the 14 student activists in execution of an arrest warrant issued by the Bangkok Military Court. They were charged with violating National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) Order No. 3/2015, which bans gatherings of more than five people, and Article 116 of the Thai Criminal Code regarding sedition. On June 27 the Bangkok Military Court granted remand in custody of the 14 student activists for 12 days. The 13 men are detained at the Bangkok Remand Prison, and one woman is held at the Woman Correctional Institution.

During the night of June 26-27, Ms. Sirikan together with seven other TLHR colleagues were on duty and assisted the 14 students activists as lawyers.

After finishing her duty of providing legal assistance to them at the Bangkok Military Court, Ms. Sirikan was requested by police officials lead by Police Major General Chayapol Chatchaidej, commander of the Sixth Division of Metropolitan Police Bureau, to have her car searched to confiscate some mobile phones, which the students left with the lawyers before being brought to the prisons. Ms. Sirikan refused to let her car be searched, since the officials did not present a search warrant, and there was no justifiable evidence to conduct the search without a warrant at night. The officials then impounded her car overnight, and brought a court warrant to conduct the search on 27 June 2015. Miss Sirikan later filed a complaint of malfeasance, under Section 157 of the Thai Criminal Code, against General Chayapol Chatchayadetch and others for illegally impounding her car.

Consequently, the police filed complaints against her, accusing her of refusing to comply with an official order without any reasonable cause or excuse after being informed of an order of an official given according to the power invested by law, and an offence of concealing or making away of property or document ordered by the official to be sent as evidence or for execution of the law, under Sections 368 and 142 of the Thai Criminal Code, and an offence of giving false information concerning a criminal offence to an inquiry official to subject an individual to a punishment under Sections 172 and 174 of the Criminal Code.

Since the police investigation at the Chanasongkram Police Station has been completed, and Ms. Sirikan’s case has been sent to the public prosecutor of Dusit District Court in Bangkok, on 27 April 2016, Ms. Sirikan received a summons to report herself to the public prosecutor. The prosecutor informed Ms. Sirikan that police investigators have agreed to press charges against her under Articles 368 and 142 of the Thai Criminal Code on 12 May 2016.

As you must be aware however, under Thai law, after the police have concluded an investigation and decide to proceed with a case, they announce the date on which the case file and the charged person will be presented to the public prosecutor. The public prosecutor will then decide whether to prosecute the case or issue a non-prosecution order. Therefore, Ms. Sirikan and her legal team have submitted an appeal for justice with the public prosecutor, to examine more witnesses and consider her legal/factual arguments, and hopefully dismiss the case.

Nevertheless, according to the prosecutor, they will announce whether to indict Ms. Sirikan on 27 July 2016.

I am concerned that this case has created a perception that lawyers providing legal representation in so-called ‘political’ cases may face harassment from police and other State authorities. They undermine the ability of lawyers in Thailand to conduct their professional functions without fear of official reprisals.

I wish to point out that it is a fundamental principle in international law that lawyers must be able to represent their clients without fear of retaliation, interference or harassment. Principle 16 of the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers states that: “Governments shall ensure that lawyers… are able to perform all of their professional functions without intimidation, hindrance, harassment or improper interference”. The Basic Principles have been applied in international jurisprudence, as an extension of the right to a fair trial in Article 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), to which Thailand is a party. The Basic Principles further recognize that lawyers “shall not be identified with their clients or their clients’ causes as a result of discharging their functions.” Indeed, lawyers must be able to act freely, diligently and fearlessly in accordance with the wishes of their clients.

In addition, the ICCPR also guarantees the right to peaceful assembly; the right to freedom of expression; the prohibition of arbitrary arrest or detention and the right to a fair and public hearing by a competent, independent and impartial tribunal established by law (including the right of prompt access to a lawyer and precluding jurisdiction of military courts over civilians in circumstances such as these); and the prohibition of arbitrary or unlawful interference with privacy, family, home and correspondence (which includes arbitrary searches or seizures).

Hence, I urge the Thai authorities to:

1. Call on the Thai Royal Police to guarantee in all circumstances the physical and psychological integrity of Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri;

2. Call on the Thai Royal Police and the Office of Attorney General to immediately and unconditionally drop all charges against Ms. Sirikan, and put an end to all acts of judicial harassment against her;

3. Call on Thai authorities and the Lawyer Council of Thailand to comply with the national and international law safeguarding the independence of lawyers and protecting them from unlawful interference in their professional activities.

Yours Sincerely,

……………….

PLEASE SEND YOUR LETTERS TO:

1. General Prayuth Chan-ocha

Prime Minister

Head of the National Council for Peace and Order

Royal Thai Army Commander-in-Chief

Rachadamnoen Nok Road

Bang Khun Phrom

Bangkok 10200

THAILAND

E-mail: [email protected]

2. Mr. Paiboon Khumchaya

Minister of Justice

The Government Complex Commemorating His Majesty the King’s 80th Birthday Anniversary 5th December, B.E.2550 (2007), Building B 120 Moo 3

Chaengwattana Road

Thoongsonghong, Laksi Bangkok 10210

THAILAND

Tel: +66 2 14 5100

Email: [email protected]

3. Pol Gen Chakthip Chaijinda

Commissioner General of the Royal Thai Police

Rama I Rd, Khwaeng Pathum Wan,

Khet Pathum Wan, Bangkok 10330

THAILAND

4. Pol.Sub.Lt. Pongniwat Yuthaphunboripahn

Deputy Attorney General.

The Office of the Attorney General

The Government Complex Commemorating His Majesty the King’s 80th Birthday Anniversary 5th December, B.E.2550 (2007), Building B 120 Moo 3

Chaengwattana Road

Thoongsonghong, Laksi Bangkok 10210

THAILAND

Tel: +66 2 142 1444

Fax: +66 2 143 9546

Email: [email protected]

5. Mr. What Tingsamitr

Chairman, National Human Rights Commission

The Government Complex Commemorating His Majesty the King’s 80th Birthday Anniversary 5th December

B.E.2550 (2007), Building B 120 Moo 3

Chaengwattana Road

Thoongsonghong, Laksi Bangkok 10210

THAILAND

E-mail: [email protected]

6. Mr. Dej-Udom Krairit

President, Lawyers Council of Thailand under the Royal Patronage

7/89 Buidling 10, Ratchadamnoen Klang Road, Bawornnivej Sub-District,

Phranakorn District, Bangkok 10200

THAILAND

Tel: +66 2 629 1430

Fax: +66 2282-9908

Thank you.

Urgent Appeals Programme

Asian Human Rights Commission ([email protected])

 

Thailand: Junta Leader Seeks Sweeping Powers

http://www.hrw.org/node/133863

 For Immediate Release

Thailand: Junta Leader Seeks Sweeping Powers

Would Invoke Constitutional Provision With Limitless Scope

(New York, April 1, 2015) – Thai Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha is seeking to invoke a constitutional provision that would give him unlimited powers without safeguards against human rights violations, Human Rights Watch said today.

On March 31, 2015, Prayuth announced that he has requested King Bhumibol Adulyadej’s permission to lift martial law, which has been enforced nationwide since the May 2014 military coup. Prayuth, who chairs the ruling National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) junta, said he would replace the Martial Law Act of 1914 with section 44 of the 2014 interim constitution, which would allow him to issue orders without administrative, legislative, or judicial oversight or accountability.

“General Prayuth’s activation of constitution section 44 will mark Thailand’s deepening descent into dictatorship,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Thailand’s friends abroad should not be fooled by this obvious sleight of hand by the junta leader to replace martial law with a constitutional provision that effectively provides unlimited and unaccountable powers.”

Under section 44, Prayuth as the NCPO chairman can issue orders and undertake acts without regard to the human rights implications, Human Rights Watch said. Section 44 states that “where the head of the NCPO is of opinion that it is necessary for the benefit of reforms in any field, or to strengthen public unity and harmony, or for the prevention, disruption or suppression of any act that undermines public peace and order or national security, the monarchy, national economics or administration of State affairs,” the head of the NCPO is empowered to “issue orders, suspend or act as deemed necessary.… Such actions are completely legal and constitutional.” No judicial or other oversight mechanism exists to examine use of these powers. Prayuth only needs to report his decisions and actions to the National Legislative Assembly and to the prime minister, a position he also occupies, after they are taken.

Prayuth has previously stated that orders issued under section 44 would allow the military to arrest and detain civilians. Since the May 2014 coup, the junta has detained hundreds of politicians, activists, journalists, and others who they accuse of supporting the deposed Yingluck Shinawatra government, disrespecting or offending the monarchy, or being involved in anti-coup protests and activities. Military personnel have interrogated many of these detainees in secret and unauthorized military facilities without providing access to their lawyers or ensuring other safeguards against mistreatment.

The NCPO has continually refused to provide information about people in secret detention. The risk of enforced disappearance, torture, and other ill treatment significantly increases when detainees are held incommunicado in military detention. However, there have been no indications of any official inquiry by Thai authorities into reports of torture and mistreatment in military custody.

The use of military courts, which lack independence and fail to comply with international fair trial standards, to try civilians is likely to continue under section 44, Human Rights Watch said. Three days after seizing power on May 22, 2014, the NCPO issued its 37th order, which replaced civilian courts with military tribunals for some offenses – including actions violating penal code articles 107 to 112, which concern lese majeste crimes, and crimes regarding national security and sedition as stipulated in penal code articles 113 to 118. Individuals who violate the NCPO’s orders have also been subjected to trial by military court. Hundreds of people, most of them political dissidents, have been sent to trials in military courts since the coup.

The imposition of section 44 means the junta’s lifting of martial law is unlikely to lead to improvement of respect for human rights in Thailand, Human Rights Watch said. The junta will have legal justification to continue its crackdown on those exercising their fundamental rights and freedoms. Criticism of the government can still be prosecuted, peaceful political activity banned, free speech censored and subject to punishment, and opposition of military rule not permitted.

“General Prayuth’s action to tighten rather than loosen his grip on power puts the restoration of democratic civilian rule further into the future,” Adams said. “Concerted pressure from Thailand’s allies is urgently needed to reverse this dangerous course.”

For more Human Rights Watch reporting on Thailand, please visit:
http://www.hrw.org/thailand

For more information, please contact:
In Bangkok, Sunai Phasuk (English and Thai):+66-81-632-3052 (mobile); or [email protected] Twitter: @SunaiBKK
In San Francisco, Brad Adams (English): +1-347-463-3531 (mobile); or [email protected] Twitter: @BradAdamsHRW
In Washington, DC, John Sifton (English): +1-646-479-2499 (mobile); or [email protected] Twitter: @johnsifton

 

 

 

การค้ามนุษย์ข้ามชาติ (the Human Trafficking on Transnational Plane)

การค้ามนุษย์ข้ามชาติ (the Human Trafficking on Transnational Plane)

๑. เมื่อเราพูด หรือ กล่าวถึง “การค้ามนุษย์ข้ามชาติ” นั้น เท่าที่ปรากฏหลักฐานในประวัติศาสตร์มนุษย์นั้น เริ่มมาจากปีค.ศ. ๑๒๐๐ จนถึงปีค.ศ. ๑๕๐๐ ประเทศแรกที่บัญญัติให้ “การค้ามนุษย์ข้ามชาติ เป็นความผิดต่อกฏหมาย” ก็คือประเทศอังกฤษ ในขณะนั้น อังกฤษเริ่มเป็น และต่อมาได้เป็นชาติมหาอำนาจทางทะเล ซึ่งในสมัยนั้นเรียกว่า การค้ามนุษย์ว่า เป็น“การค้าทาส” (Trading on Slavery) โดยอังกฤษ อ้างเอาข้อห้าม มิให้มีการค้าทาส มาจากหลักในทางศาสนา ทั้งนี้เพื่อป้องกันมิให้มีการไปไล่จับคนในทวีปอาฟริกา พรากเขามาจากแผ่นดินแม่ของเขา เพื่อเอาไปเป็นทาสใช้แรงงานในอาณานิคมทั้ง ๑๓ แห่งบนทวีปอเมริกาเหนือ โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่ง ไปใช้เป็นแรงงานในไร่ฝ้าย เพื่อเก็บฝ้ายในมลรัฐทางใต้ของสหรัฐอเมริกาในขณะนั้น ยังดำรงสถานะเป็นอาณานิคมของอังกฤษ (จากบทความเรื่อง Transnational regimes for combating in persons: Reflections on the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Dr. Emmanuel Obuah, Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Alabama A&M University)
๒. ในเวลาต่อมา เราก็ได้เห็น ข้อห้ามมิให้มีการค้าทาส เป็นลายลักษณ์อักษรขึ้นในสนธิสัญญาสองฝ่าย หรือ ทวิภาคี (Bilateral Treaty) ในระหว่างสหรัฐอเมริกา กับอังกฤษ ปรากฏเป็นลายลักษณ์อักษรในสนธิสัญญาสงบศึกระหว่าง สหรัฐอเมริกา และอังกฤษ ในสงครามประกาศอิสรภาพของสหรัฐ ที่ลงนามกันที่กรุงปารีส ที่เรียกว่า “The Paris Treaty of September 30, 1783” ที่ท่านผู้ใฝ่รู้ทั้งหลายอาจค้นคว้าผ่านเครื่องอ่านของกูเกิ้ล โดยพิมพ์วลีว่า “Avalon Project” แล้วพิมพ์ชื่อสนธิสัญญานี้ใส่บนมุมขวาของหน้าแรกของ “Avalon Project” ท่านก็สามารถ Download เอาสนธิสัญญานี้มาศึกษาได้โดยละเอียด
๓.ในปีค.ศ. 1814 อังกฤษ และ สหรัฐอเมริกา ได้มีการลงนามในสนธิสัญญาสองฝ่าย “ห้ามทำการค้าทาส ทางเรือ” ทั้งนี้ เพื่อป้องกัน มิให้มีการนำ ทาสผิวดำจากทวีปอาฟริกาเข้าสู่มลรัฐทางใต้ ของสหรัฐอเมริกา เพื่อไปทำงาน เป็นทาสแรงงานในไร่ฝ้าย สนธิสัญญานี้ลงนามกัน ที่เมือง Ghent ประเทศเบลเยี่ยม ในวันที่ 24 ธันวาคม ปีค.ศ. 1814 คู่ภาคีสนธิสัญญาฉบับนี้ ต่างตกลงกัน ตามสนธิสัญญานี้ ที่จะแลกเปลี่ยนสัตยาบัน ภายในเวลา สี่เดือนนับแต่วันที่ได้ลงนามในสนธิสัญญานี้ ที่ กรุงวอชิงตัน ดี.ซี. เราเรียกสนธิสัญญานี้ว่า “Treaty of Ghent, 1814”
๔. ต่อมาในปีค.ศ. 1842 เมื่ออังกฤษ และสหรัฐอเมริกา ตกลงกันในเรื่องเส้นเขตแดนระหว่างรัฐเมนของสหรัฐอเมริกา กับแคนนาดา (ประเทศ หรือ ดินแดนในอารักขาของอังกฤษ ) อังกฤษ และสหรัฐอเมริกา ก็ได้มีการทำสนธิสัญญากันในชื่อว่า “The Webster – Ashburton Treaty, 1842 สนธิสัญญาฉบับนี้ มีการแลกเปลี่ยนตราสาร เพื่อให้บังคับตามสนธิสัญญา เมื่อวันที่ ๑๕ ตุลาคม ปีค.ศ. ๑๘๔๒ และให้มีผล เป็นการประกาศบังคับใช้ในระหว่างรัฐคู่ภาคีในวันที่ ๑๐ พฤศจิกายน ปีค.ศ. ๑๘๔๒ ความในสนธิสัญญาฉบับนี้ นอกจากจะมีข้อสนธิสัญญาผูกพันกันในเรื่องดินแดน ยังประสงค์ที่จะผูกพันบังคับกันในเรื่อง การส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน และในเรื่องข้อห้ามการค้าทาสทางทะเล หรือ ทางเรืออีกด้วย. (มีต่อ)




การค้ามนุษย์ข้ามชาติ (the Human Trafficking on Transnational Plane)

การส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน (Extradition)

โดย ทีมงานกฎหมายภาคีไทยเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชน

S__1032655การส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนเป็น ช่องทางหนึ่งที่ประชาคมระหว่างประเทศ ใช้ในการติดตามจับกุมผู้กระทำความผิด หรือผู้ถูกกล่าวหา ที่หนีไปประเทศอื่น โดยปกติแล้ว อำนาจอธิปไตยของรัฐย่อมจำกัดเฉพาะภายในดินแดนหรืออาณาเขตของตนเท่านั้น ตามกฎหมายระหว่างประเทศ รัฐหนึ่งจะใช้อำนาจอธิปไตยเหนือกว่าอีกรัฐหนึ่งโดยที่รัฐนั้นไม่ยินยอมไม่ ได้ ดังนั้น เมื่อผู้ถูกกล่าวหาหรือจำเลยได้ไปอยู่ต่างประเทศ รัฐเจ้าของสัญชาติของผู้ถูกกล่าวหา หรือจำเลย จะส่งเจ้าหน้าที่ของรัฐไปจับกุมในต่างประเทศไม่ได้ เพราะเป็นการละเมิดอำนาจอธิปไตยของรัฐอื่น ดังนั้น รัฐเจ้าของสัญชาติจึงต้องร้องขอให้มีการช่วยเหลือที่จะติดตามจับกุมผู้ต้อง หาหรือจำเลยมาให้ โดยปกติแล้ว ความร่วมมือระหว่างประเทศในเรื่องการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน จะกระทำในรูปของสนธิสัญญาทวิภาคีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน ซึ่งเป็นฐานของความร่วมมือระหว่างรัฐที่ร้องขอให้มีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน (Requesting state) กับรัฐที่ถูกร้องขอให้ส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน (Requested state) อย่างไรก็ดี หากไม่มีสนธิสัญญาระหว่างกัน รัฐก็สามารถใช้ “หลักต่างตอบแทน” (Reciprocity) ได้ (ซึ่งผิดกับกรณี “การโอนตัวนักโทษ” ที่ต้องมีสนธิสัญญาระหว่างรัฐที่ร้องขอกับรัฐที่ได้รับการร้องขอเสมอ)

Screen Shot 2015-03-18 at 11.11.15 PMอย่างไรก็ดี แม้จะมีสนธิสัญญาส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนก็ตาม ก็มิได้หมายความว่าเมื่อมีการร้องขอให้มีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนแล้ว รัฐที่ได้รับการร้องขอจะต้องส่งให้ตามคำร้องเสมอ โดยปกติแล้ว ตามสนธิสัญญาว่าด้วยการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน หรือกฎหมายภายในเกี่ยวกับการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน จะระบุเงื่อนไขหรือเกณฑ์ที่ใช้พิจารณารวมถึงข้อยกเว้นบางประการด้วย เกณฑ์หรือเงื่อนไขของการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนที่สำคัญคือ

ประการเเรก ความผิดที่จะส่งให้แก่กันได้นั้นต้องเป็นความผิดของทั้งสองประเทศ คือทั้งของประเทศที่ร้องขอ และประเทศที่ได้รับการร้องขอ ไม่ว่าจะเรียกฐานความผิดในชื่อใดก็ตาม เกณฑ์นี้นักกฎหมายเรียกว่า Double-criminality หรือ Double-jeopardy
ประการที่สอง โทษขั้นต่ำของฐานความผิด (เช่น ต้องไม่ต่ำกว่า 1 ปี)
ประการที่สาม ความผิดที่จะถูกดำเนินคดีได้เมื่อมีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนตามคำขอนั้น รัฐที่ร้องขอจะพิจารณาคดีเเละลงโทษได้เฉพาะความผิดที่ร้องขอเท่านั้น จะไปดำเนินคดีในความผิดฐานอื่นที่เกิดขึ้นก่อนที่จะมีการร้องขอให้มีการส่ง ผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนไม่ได้ เกณฑ์ข้อนี้มีไว้เพื่อป้องกันมิให้มีการดำเนินคดีในความผิดที่ไม่อาจส่ง ผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนให้เเก่กันได้ แต่รัฐได้อาศัยช่องทางของการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนในความผิดฐานหนึ่ง เพื่อไปดำเนินคดีหรือลงโทษในอีกความผิดฐานหนึ่ง เกณฑ์นี้เรียกว่า “Specialty”

ความผิดทางการเมือง (Political Offenses)
เป็นที่ยอมรับกันในหมู่ประเทศตะวันตกหลังการปฏิวัติฝรั่งเศสว่า การแสดงความคิดเห็นทางการเมืองที่แตกต่างกันเป็นสิ่งปกติในสังคมระบอบ ประชาธิปไตย และเป็นสิทธิมนุษยชนที่สำคัญยิ่ง ดังนั้น หากบุคคลได้กระทำความผิดที่มีลักษณะทางการเมืองแล้ว ความผิดทางการเมืองย่อมไม่อยู่ในข่ายที่จะส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน

ปัญหาก็คือ สนธิสัญญาทวิภาคีส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนก็ดี กฎหมายภายในของรัฐเกี่ยวกับการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนก็ดี ไม่ได้มีการให้คำนิยามว่า ความผิดทางการเมืองคืออะไร โดยปกติแล้ว การพิจารณาว่าความผิดใดเป็นความผิดอาญาธรรมดาหรือความผิดทางการเมืองนั้น เป็นดุลพินิจหรือเป็นปัญหาการตีความขององค์กรตุลาการของรัฐ ที่ได้รับการร้องขอให้มีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน ไม่เกี่ยวกับรัฐที่ร้องขอแต่อย่างใด ปัญหาขอบเขตของความหมายความผิดทางการเมืองนั้นเป็นปัญหาที่มีความยุ่ง ยากอยู่มิใช่น้อย เนื่องจากเกณฑ์ที่ใช้พิจารณานั้นมีอยู่หลายเกณฑ์ และในหลายกรณีศาลก็มิได้อาศัยเกณฑ์หนึ่งเกณฑ์ใดเป็นปัจจัยชี้ขาด แต่ศาลอาจพิจารณาเกณฑ์อื่นๆ ควบคู่กันไป อีกทั้งทางปฏิบัติของแต่ละประเทศก็มีความแตกต่างกันไปด้วย การกระทำบางอย่างอาจมองว่าเป็นความผิดทางการเมืองอย่างแจ้งชัด เช่น การประท้วงทางการเมือง การก่อกบฏ การต่อสู้เพื่อแย่งชิงอำนาจทางการเมืองหรือต่อสู้เรียกร้องเอกราช การวิพากษ์วิจารณ์ทางการเมือง เป็นต้น การกระทำเหล่านี้นักกฎหมายใช้เกณฑ์ที่เรียกว่า “Incident test”

TAHR-Meetingอย่างไรก็ดี ความผิดทางการเมืองในปัจจุบันมิได้จำกัดแค่ “ความผิดทางการเมือง” (political offense) แต่เพียงอย่างเดียว แต่อาจรวมถึง “ความผิดที่เกี่ยวข้องหรือเชื่อมโยงกับความผิดทางการเมือง” (an offense connected with a political offense) ด้วยอย่างเช่น กฎหมายส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนระหว่างประเทศอังกฤษกับไอร์แลนด์ ฉะนั้น ปัจจุบันนักกฎหมายบางท่านจึงใช้คำว่า ความผิดที่มีลักษณะทางการเมือง (Political character) แทน
นอกจากนี้ ความผิดทางการเมืองมิได้จำกัดเพียงแค่ “การกระทำ” (act) ของผู้กระทำแต่เพียงอย่างเดียวอย่างที่เข้าใจกัน แต่รวมถึงปัจจัยอย่างอื่นด้วย เช่น แรงจูงใจของรัฐบาลที่ร้องขอให้มีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดน ว่ามีแรงจูงใจทางการเมืองแอบแฝงหรือไม่ ที่เรียกว่า “Political Motive of the Requesting State” หรือ การปฏิบัติต่อผู้ต้องหาหรือจำเลยในเรื่องเกี่ยวกับสิทธิมนุษยชน โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งสิทธิที่จะได้รับการพิจารณาคดีอย่างเป็นธรรม (Fair Trail) หากศาลพิจารณาแล้วเห็นว่า สิทธิมนุษยชนต่างๆ ของจำเลย หรือผู้ถูกกล่าวหาจะถูกละเมิด ศาลก็อาจปฏิเสธที่จะส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนได้ ทั้งนี้ขึ้นอยู่กับพยานหลักฐานที่ผู้ถูกกล่าวหาหรือจำเลยจะต้องแสดงให้ศาล เห็นว่า สิทธิการพิจารณาคดีอย่างเป็นธรรมหรือสิทธิมนุษยชนอื่นๆ ของตนจะถูกละเมิดได้

ยิ่งไปกว่านั้น ศาลของหลายประเทศยังได้ให้ความสำคัญกับระบอบการปกครองของประเทศที่ร้องขอให้ มีการส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนด้วยว่ามีระบอบการปกครองที่เป็นประชาธิปไตยมากน้อย แค่ไหน มีการรับรองหลักนิติรัฐหรือไม่ เกณฑ์นี้เรียกว่า “The Political Structure of the Requesting State” เกณฑ์นี้ศาลอังกฤษเคยใช้ในคดี Kolczynski โดยศาลอังกฤษปฏิเสธที่จะส่งผู้ร้ายข้ามแดนไปให้ประเทศโปแลนด์ ซึ่งพิจารณาตามมาตรฐานของประเทศอังกฤษ (หรือประเทศตะวันตก) แล้ว โปแลนด์ในเวลานั้นยังไม่เป็นประชาธิปไตยตามมาตรฐานของประเทศตะวันตก

 

Message from TAHR Chairman, Board of Directors (Academic Seminar, January, 2014)

Message from TAHR Chairman, Board of Directors (Academic Seminar, January, 2014, in Thai)